Sunday, February 07, 2016

Arizona legislature: The coming week

Trying a new format for this post - last week, between my schedule and the lege's willingness to push a multitude of bad bills, I was unable to keep up and failed to complete this post.

As such, I'm going to try to highlight the worst of the worst (and on those occasions when it is warranted, the best of the best).

There are many bad bills going before committee this week -

SB1142, forcing DCS to privatize investigations of its backload of cases (Senate Health and Human Services, Wednesday)

SB1485, barring state employees from using payroll deductions to make contributions to Planned Parenthood (Senate Government, Wednesday)

SB1486, repealing nine of the ten sections of Arizona law that pertain to presidential primary elections, and massively changing the one section that isn't repealed (Senate Government, Wednesday)

SB1141 and SB1423, gold and silver are both legal tender for debts and exempt from taxation bills (Senate Financial Institutions, Wednesday)

SB1125, reducing and even ending funding to school districts for desegregation-related activities (Senate Finance, Thursday)

SB1279, expanding school vouchers in a huge way (Senate Finance, Thursday)

HB2494, creating a tax credit for holders of concealed weapons permits (House Ways and Means, Monday) 

HB2010, making the collection of early ballots a class six felony (there is a Senate version of this bill) (House Elections, Monday)

HB2446, making changes to weapons regarded as "prohibited weapons" under Arizona law (House Judiciary, Wednesday)

HB2537, expanding the number of justices on the Arizona Supreme Court from five to seven (House Judiciary, Wednesday)

HB2223, withholding state shared revenue from "sanctuary cities" (House Government and Higher Education, Thursday)

HB2417, barring municipalities from spending anything resembling public monies to pay an HCA-related tax on high-cost employer-sponsored health coverage (House Government and Higher Education, Thursday)

The above list is far from comprehensive, but you get the point.  There is a lot of "ugly" at the Arizona State Legislature.

On to the "highlight" of this post...


This week's winner of the "They're not just drinking the Kool-Aid at the Capitol this week, they're mainlining it" award:

House Federalism and States' Rights, Wednesday, 9 a.m., HHR5.

This agenda is short (one presentation, three bill proposals), but is also 100% "Bay at the Moon" time. 

The presentation is from Jerry Hertaus. a Republican state legislator who could well fit in with the Arizona definition of "Republican state legislator" (pro-gun, pro-fetus, anti-federal government, anti-choice, anti-public safety net, etc...).


The bills are HB2024, barring the state and all of its political subdivisions (counties, municipalities, etc.) from assisting or complying with federal laws, regulations, or policies unless the aforementioned has been specifically approved by Congress; HB2201, stating that the state doesn't have to follow a federal law, regulation, policy, etc., unless it wants to; and HB2617, boycotting companies that are boycotting Israel.


The rest -

Notes:

All committees meetings and agendas are subject to change without notice, and frequently do.  If you plan to travel to the Capitol to observe or weigh in on the consideration of a particular measure, check with the lege ahead of time to confirm that the meeting that you are interested in is still on schedule and your item(s) of interest is still on the agenda for that meeting.

Meeting rooms designated "HHR" are in the House of Representatives building.

Meeting rooms designated "SHR" are in the Senate building.


All House committee agendas can be found here.

All Senate committee agendas can be found here.


Committee schedule (mostly just copied and pasted from the lege's websiteThe agenda links work, as of this writing, but may not later in the week if an agenda is modified in some way):

Senate Committees



Agenda Date Committee Time Room Agenda
02/11/16 Education 9:00 A.M. SHR 1 Click Here
02/11/16 Judiciary 9:30 A.M. (NOTE TIME CHANGE) SHR 109 Click Here
02/10/16 Finance 9:00 A.M. SHR 3 Click Here
02/10/16 Financial Institutions 2:00 P.M. SHR 109 Click Here
02/10/16 Government 2:00 P.M. SHR 3 Click Here
02/10/16 Health and Human Services 2:00 P.M. SHR 1 Click Here
02/10/16 Public Safety, Military and Technology 9:00 A.M. SHR 1 Click Here
02/09/16 Appropriations 2:00 P.M. SHR 109 Click Here
02/09/16 Federalism, Mandates and Fiscal Responsibility 9:00 A.M. SHR 3 Click Here
02/09/16 Transportation 2:00 P.M. SHR 1 Click Here
02/08/16 Commerce and Workforce Development 1:45 P.M. OR UPON ADJOURNMENT OF FLOOR* SHR 1 Click Here
02/08/16 Natural Resources 10:00 A.M. SHR 109 Click Here
02/08/16 Rules 1:00 P.M. Caucus Room 1 Click Here
02/08/16 State Debt and Budget Reform NOT MEETING SHR 3 Click Here
02/08/16 Water and Energy 2:00 P.M. SHR 3 Click Here





House Committees



02/11/16 Agriculture, Water and Lands 10:00 A.M. NOTE TIME CHANGE HHR 3 Click Here
02/11/16 Government and Higher Education 9:00 A.M. HHR 1 Click Here
02/11/16 Military Affairs and Public Safety 9:00 A.M. HHR 5 Click Here
02/10/16 Appropriations 2:00 P.M. HHR 1 Click Here
02/10/16 Commerce 9:30 A.M. NOTE TIME CHANGE HHR 1 Click Here
02/10/16 Education 2:00 P.M. HHR 4 Click Here
02/10/16 Federalism and States' Rights 09:00 A.M. HHR 5 Click Here
02/10/16 Insurance 10:00 A.M. NOTE TIME CHANGE HHR 4 Click Here
02/10/16 Judiciary 9:30 A.M. NOTE TIME CHANGE HHR 3 Click Here
02/09/16 Banking and Financial Services 2:00 P.M. HHR 3 Click Here
02/09/16 Health 2:00 P.M. HHR 4 Click Here
02/09/16 Rural and Economic Development 2:00 P.M. HHR 5 Click Here
02/09/16 Transportation and Infrastructure 2:00 P.M. HHR 1 Click Here
02/08/16 Children and Family Affairs 2:00 P.M. HHR 5 Click Here
02/08/16 County and Municipal Affairs 2:00 P.M. HHR 4 Click Here
02/08/16 Education 12:30 P.M. HHR 3 Click Here
02/08/16 Elections 10:00 A.M. HHR 4 Click Here
02/08/16 Energy, Environment and Natural Resources 2:00 P.M. HHR 1 Click Here
02/08/16 Rules 1:00 P.M. HHR 4 Click Here
02/08/16 Ways and Means 2:00 P.M. HHR 3 Click Here

Floor Calendars:

The House has a COW (Committee of the Whole) calendar and a Third Read (final approval) calendar scheduled for Monday.

The Senate has a Third Read calendar posted for Monday.

There will be floor calendars later in the week, but those are generally posted the day before, or even the day of, consideration.


The lege's Capitol Events calendar is here

Sunday, January 31, 2016

Arizona Legislature: The coming week

The are a *lot* of committees meeting this week, and many agendas will be changed during the week. 

We've reached the part of the legislative season when a lot of "bad" bills will be quietly moving forward.  This may be the best time to stop, or at least weaken, them.  The lack of attention paid to them now that allows them to move without much opposition also allows changes to them before the R base can be rallied around those bad bills. 

Note to readers: due to schedule conflicts this weekend I could only look at committee agendas for Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday.  This post will be updated by Wednesday evening to include agendas for Thursday.

Notes:

All committees meetings and agendas are subject to change without notice, and frequently do.  If you plan to travel to the Capitol to observe or weigh in on the consideration of a particular measure, check with the lege ahead of time to confirm that the meeting that you are interested in is still on schedule and your item(s) of interest is still on the agenda for that meeting.

Meeting rooms designated "HHR" are in the House of Representatives building.

Meeting rooms designated "SHR" are in the Senate building.

Some agendas are summarized as "looks harmless", but if they cover an area of interest to you, examine the agenda and the bills on it.  If I missed something significant, please leave a comment letting me know.


All House committee agendas can be found here.

All Senate committee agendas can be found here.


On the House side of the Capitol:

Elections, Monday, 10 a.m., HHR4.  On the agenda: HB2456, joining an interstate compact to elect the president via the national popular vote; HCR2009, a proposed amendment to the state's constitution to make positions on the Arizona Independent Redistricting Commission elected positions; HCR2020, creating a lieutenant governor position where candidates would be named by, and run as a ticket with, specific gubernatorial candidates.

Health, Monday, 11:30 a.m. Offsite.  Special meeting: a tour of the facility of VisionGate in Phoenix.

Rules, Monday, 1 p.m., HHR4.  Long agenda.  May take all of 15 minutes to rubber stamp it.

Energy, Environment, and Natural Resources, Monday, 2 p.m.., HHR1.  Looks harmless, but the agenda contains HB2171, an "omnibus" bill affecting weights and measures.  Such bill are supposed to contain noncontroversial clauses, but this bunch has been known to get sneaky about these things.

County and Municipal Affairs, Monday, 2 p.m., HHR4.  Looks harmless, so far.

Children and Family Affairs, Monday, 2 p.m., HHR5.  Looks harmless, so far.


Transportation and Infrastructure, Tuesday, 2 p.m., HHR1.  Looks harmless, so far.

Rural and Economic Development, Tuesday, 2 p.m., HHR5.  On the agenda: HB2182, removing the requirement that beer and wine retail outlets be at least 5000 square feet in size before they can offer samples; HB2372, allowing grocery stores that are located within 300 feet of a church or school, if certain conditions are met; HB2533, exempting certain aircraft and aircraft sales from taxation.

Health, Tuesday, 2 p.m., HHR4.  Regular meeting.  Long agenda.  Among the items on it: a proposed striker to HB2362, text not yet available, working title "nurse licensure compact"; there are many bills on this agenda that may be harmless, but I don't understand the bills well enough (and understand the sponsors too well) to be comfortable making that evaluation.  For example, HB2290 relates to AHCCCS and disproportionate share hospital payments, and I don't have sufficient knowledge in that area to evaluate the bill.  However, the sponsors of the bill are R representatives Rusty Bowers and Mark Finchem, and the next time that they support something that enhances the social safety net will probably be the very first time.

Banking and Financial Services, Tuesday, 2 p.m., HHR3.  Another agenda filled with bills that are very topic-specific and beyond my understanding


Federalism and States' Rights, Wednesday, 9 a.m., HHR5.  On the agenda: HB2457, creating a compact among states regarding a proposal for an amendment to the US Constitution to both mandate that Congress pass a balanced budget and removing Congress' authority to raise the national debt limit, and granting that authority to state legislatures.

Commerce, Wednesday, 9:30 a.m., HHR1. On the agenda: HB2081, a measure to outlaw background checks for private firearms sales by outlawing background checks for all transfers of private property; HB2113, giving employers more power and time to appeal decisions from DES that they (the employers) don't like.

Judiciary, Wednesday, 10 a.m., HHR3. On the agenda: A proposed striker to HB2383, restricting public access to law enforcement records; HB2446, narrowing the definition of "prohibited weapon" under AZ law; HB2183, allowing the state department of corrections to search prisoners using "low dose ionizing radiation"; HB2030, allowing retired LEOs to be armed while getting soused (OK, the actual language pertains to allowing retired LEOs to be armed while in bars and other premises with liquor).

Insurance, Wednesday, 10 a.m., HHR4. On the agenda: HB2240, "modifying" (such a "neutral" word) workers' comp law in ways that protect employers and harm workers.

Appropriations, Wednesday, 2 p.m., HHR1.  The agenda looks relatively harmless, for now.

Education, Wednesday, 2 p.m., HHR4.  On the agenda: HB2190 (again), an education "omnibus" bill that would allow schools to administer pesticides without informing parents, students, or employees; HB2544, mandating that the state board of education adopt a list ("menu" is the word used) of assessment tests for local districts/agencies to choose from.


Military Affairs and Public Safety, Thursday, 9 a.m., HHR5.  On the agenda: HB2074, a public safety officers "omnibus" bill.  Among its clauses: giving PSOs qualified immunity if they harm someone through an act of omission; a striker to HB2514 that would allow sales people in the real estate, cemetery, and camping industries to drive a vehicle for work even after a DUI conviction.

Government and Higher Education, Thursday, 9 a.m., HHR1.  On the agenda: HB2157, barring new public employees from enrolling in the state's pension plan; HB2341, exempting potluck dinners/gatherings that aren't held in a workplace from regulations (currently, potlucks that are held at work are exempt, but outside of work, they are not exempt)


On the Senate side of the Capitol:

Natural Resources, Monday, 9 a.m., SHR109.  On the agenda: SB1163, mandating notifications in the event of damage to an underground "facility" (context makes this look like that it means "pipeline") that carries certain hazardous substances; there is a proposed amendment to the bill that would weaken the bill, changing the notification requirement from when a facility is damaged to when a facility is damaged in a way that results in a discharge from the facility; SB1243, imposing reporting requirements upon the Arizona Game and Fish Department regarding Mexican gray wolves.  The feds may have a problem with this one; SB1270, relating to the Office of Pest Management. Many clauses, but the most interesting one is the one that reduces notification requirements when pesticides are used in schools or childcare facilities -


In other words, the bill is long, complicated, and most definitely NOT harmless.

State Debt and Budget Reform, Monday, 10 a.m., SHR3.  Propaganda presentation from a Goldwater Institute/Koch Brothers mouthpiece.

Rules, Monday, 1 p.m., Senate Caucus Room 1.  Long agenda.  May take all of 15 minutes to rubber stamp.

Water and Energy, Monday, 2 p.m., SHR3.  On the agenda: SB1243 (for the 2nd time on Monday); SB1268, loosening requirements that planned subdivisions prove that they have adequate water supplies before they receive final approval; SCM1007, a love letter to the feds urging them to stop making efforts to reduce ozone levels in our air.


Transportation, Tuesday, 2 p.m., SHR1.  Looks relatively harmless.

Federalism, Mandates, and Fiscal Responsibility, Tuesday, 2 p.m., SHR3. One bill on the agenda: SB1156.  Already written about this one.

Appropriations, Tuesday, 2 p.m., SHR109.  Looks relatively harmless.


Finance, Wednesday, 9 a.m., SHR3.  Looks harmless, but my understanding in this area is limited.

Public Safety, Military, and Technology, Wednesday, 9 a.m., SHR1.  OK, they're going to need to break out the Kool-Aid IVs for this one.  To whit:

Two presentations, one about Muslim radicals and one about the border...

SB1266, punishing officials and political subdivisions that enact or enforce any firearms-related rules, ordinances, or laws that are any stricter than anything enacted by the state...

SB1377, mandating, that regardless of the circumstances or the underlying crime, any defendant facing an immigration-related charge must serve the maximum sentence prior to release, even if that release would be to ICE to be deported...

SB1378, withholding state share revenue from any city determined to be a "sanctuary city"...

SCM1006, a love letter to the feds asking for more federal personnel at ports of entry in Arizona...

SCR1010, asking the voters to ban the use of photo radar for traffic enforcement in Arizona...


Health and Human Services, Wednesday, 2 p.m., SHR1.  Looks relatively harmless, but all but one of the bills on the agenda is from Sen. Nancy Barto.  In other words, take "relatively harmless" with a grain of salt.

Government, Wednesday, 2 p.m., SHR3.  On the agenda: SB1256, removing assayer requirements (i.e. - testing) from drug lab remediation (toxic substance cleanup); SB1257, exempting possessors of CCW permits (concealed carry) from laws regarding misconduct involving weapons in public establishments or public events; SB1266, punishing officials and political subdivisions that enact or enforce any firearms-related rules, ordinances, or laws that are any stricter than anything enacted by the state; SB1282, a John Kavanagh special, this one reducing public access to public records; SB1284, another Kavanagh special, this one restricting someone's ability to sue someone else for violations of ADA-related laws.

Financial Institutions, Wednesday, 2 p.m., SHR109.  Short agenda.  Looks harmless, but the actual effect of these bills is unclear to me.


Floor Calendars:

There are no floor calendars posted for Monday, but that may (and probably will) change.

There will be floor calendars later in the week, but those are generally posted the day before, or even the day of, consideration.


The lege's Capitol Events calendar is here.

Saturday, January 30, 2016

The first striker of the legislative session says a lot...like that the Ducey stooges at the Capitol *really* despise Diane Douglas

...Sometimes, proposals before the AZ legislature communicate more with what they *don't* say than with what they *do* say...

Note for readers who aren't familiar with the personalities that are part of Arizona's political scene:

"Ducey" refers to Doug Ducey, Arizona's governor
"Douglas" refers to Diane Douglas, Arizona's superintendent of public instruction

Sen. Judy Burges (R-Birther) has the honor of introducing the first striker, or strike-everything amendment, of the legislative session.  It's a rather dubious honor, as she uses the striker to declare her fealty to Doug Ducey, Arizona's governor.

Arizona's executive line of succession (basically, how a vacancy in the governor's office is filled) is specified in the Arizona Constitution.

Article 5, Section 6 of the state's constitution (emphasis added) -
Death, resignation, removal or disability of governor; succession to office; impeachment, absence from state or temporary disability
 
Section 6. In the event of the death of the governor, or his resignation, removal from office, or permanent disability to discharge the duties of the office, the secretary of state, if holding by election, shall succeed to the office of governor until his successor shall be elected and shall qualify. If the secretary of state be holding otherwise than by election, or shall fail to qualify as governor, the attorney general, the state treasurer, or the superintendent of public instruction, if holding by election, shall, in the order named, succeed to the office of governor. The taking of the oath of office as governor by any person specified in this section shall constitute resignation from the office by virtue of the holding of which he qualifies as governor. Any successor to the office shall become governor in fact and entitled to all of the emoluments, powers and duties of governor upon taking the oath of office.

In the event of the impeachment of the governor, his absence from the state, or other temporary disability to discharge the duties of the office, the powers and duties of the office of governor shall devolve upon the same person as in case of vacancy, but only until the disability ceases.
This year, Sen. Burges introduced SB1156, relating to, but not changing, the order of succession.

From the bill (emphasis added) -
Section 1.  Title 38, chapter 2.1, article 1, Arizona Revised Statutes, is amended by adding section 38-387, to read:

38-387.  Absence of state elected official during official state events

A.  By choice of the governor, either the secretary of state, the attorney general, the state treasurer or the superintendent of public instruction shall be absent from the vicinity of the seat of government during the inauguration of state elected officials, the annual governor's state of the state address or any other state address by the governor where members of the executive department participate or are in attendance.  The excused elected official shall remain at least thirty-five miles away from the seat of government during such an event.
The bill is scheduled for consideration by the Burges-chaired Senate committee named "Federalism, Mandates, and Fiscal Responsibility" (Tuesday, 9 a.m., SHR3).

Now, the content of the original bill seemed pretty straightforward, if a little redundant - basically, it legislated a practice that is already in place (though I'm not sure about the "thirty-five miles away" part) and is not a violation of existing law.

Then Burges introduced a striker, proposing to change her proposal.

The striker (emphasis added)-
Strike everything after the enacting clause and insert:
"Section 1.  Title 38, chapter 2.1, article 1, Arizona Revised Statutes, is amended by adding section 38-387, to read:

38-387.  Absence of state elected officials during official state events

A.  Either the secretary of state, the attorney general or the state treasurer, on a rotating basis, shall be excused and absent from the vicinity of the seat of government during the inauguration of state elected officials, the annual governor's state of the state address or any other state address by the governor or gubernatorial event where members of the executive department participate or are in attendance.

B.  At least three hours before an event described in subsection A of this section, the excused elected official shall be transported by a protective detail established by the department of public safety to a safe and secure location that is at least twenty-five miles away from the seat of government.  The excused elected official shall remain at the safe and secure location for the duration of the event.

C.  The protective detail shall cease at the successful conclusion of the event described in subsection A of this section and on the successful return of the excused elected official to the seat of government from the safe and secure location.

Sec. 2.  Section 41-1755, Arizona Revised Statutes, is amended to read:

41-1755.  Protection for governor

The director of the department of public safety shall provide transportation, security and protection for the governor and security and protection for the governor's family, including establishing a protective detail that shall care for and protect the governor and the governor's family, to the extent and in the manner the director of the department of public safety and the governor deem appropriate and adequate.  Security and protection shall be extended to the secretary of state, the attorney general and the state treasurer to the extent and in the manner the director of the department of public safety deems appropriate and adequate on consultation with the secretary of state, the attorney general or the state treasurer and that individual's chief of staff."
 
Amend title to conform
Notice what's missing? 

Hint: Maybe Diane Douglas should start watching her back.

No matter what the legislature calls this bill ("absence of state officials"), with this striker (assuming the bill is amended in the way proposed), the bill should be renamed the "Please lay down and die Diane Douglas" bill.

Now, I understand that Doug Ducey dislikes Diane Douglas (and, to be fair, she probably doesn't like him any more than he likes her), but that personal animus doesn't justify the crafting of poor public policy.


For the record:

I don't have a dog in this particular fight -

But where Diane Douglas is just woefully out of her depth, in terms of the temperament and the professionalism needed for her job, Doug Ducey seems to have ill intent toward best interests of the people of Arizona...though not toward the Koch brothers.

Sunday, January 24, 2016

Arizona Legislature: The coming week...

The are a *lot* of committees meeting this week, and many agendas will be changed during the week. 

We've reached the part of the legislative season when a lot of "bad" bills will be quietly moving forward.  This may be the best time to stop, or at least weaken, them.  The lack of attention paid to them now that allows them to move without much opposition also allows changes to them before the R base can be rallied around those bad bills.

Notes:

All committees meetings and agendas are subject to change without notice, and frequently do.  If you plan to travel to the Capitol to observe or weigh in on the consideration of a particular measure, check with the lege ahead of time to confirm that the meeting that you are interesting in is still on schedule and your item(s) of interest is still on the agenda for that meeting.

Meeting rooms designated "HHR" are in the House of Representatives building.

Meeting rooms designated "SHR" are in the Senate building.

Some agendas are summarized as "looks harmless", but if they cover an area of interest to you, examine the agenda and the bills on it.  If I missed something significant, please leave a comment letting me know.


All House committee agendas can be found here.

All Senate committee agendas can be found here.


On the House side of the Capitol:

Elections, Monday, 10 a.m., HHR4.  One bill on the agenda: HB2023, making it a class 6 felony (one year in prison, $150K fine) for collecting another person's early ballot.  This anti-voter measure is from Rep. Michelle Ugenti-Rita (R-of course), the committee chair.

Rules, Monday, 1 p.m., HHR4.  Rubber stamp time.

Ways and Means, Monday, 2 p.m., HHR4. Caveat time: a lot of this stuff is very technical and I am almost certainly missing some nuances here.  If tax code and related stuff is of interest to you, examine this stuff closely.  Having said that, among the items of interest on this agenda: HB2008, allowing people who pay a fee for a student to participate in a public school-sponsored extracurricular activity to take a tax credit for such fees.

Energy, Environment, and Natural Resources, Monday, 2 p.m., HHR1.  One bill on the agenda: HB2325, a bill that seems to primarily impact how fees collected for wastewater and drinking water operator certifications are expended.  However, there are clauses impacting the allowable lead content in pipes.  Given the water quality disaster (and mass lead poisoning of residents) in Flint, Michigan, this one bears close examination by people who are more knowledgeable in this area.

County and Municipal Affairs, Monday, 2 p.m., HHR4.  Looks harmless so far.

Children and Family Affairs, Monday, 2 p.m., HHR5.  Looks harmless so far.


Transportation and Infrastructure, Tuesday, 2 p.m., HHR1.  On the agenda: HB2080, lowering the age minimum for driving learners' permits from 15 1/2 years old to 15; HB2250, allowing ADOT to create an advertising program utilizing non-highway assets and to sell sponsorships for their facilities.  Looks to be privatization by baby steps.

Rural and Economic Development, Tuesday, 2 p.m., HHR5.  HB2133, exempting agricultural aircraft (think: cropdusters) from sales tax.  Retroactive to 1985.

Health, Tuesday, 2 p.m., HHR4.  On the agenda: HCM2001, a love letter to Congress urging is to gut the Affordable Care Act by repealing a tax on health insurance.


Federalism and States' Rights, Wednesday, 9 a.m., HHR5.  The tin foil hat caucus will meet to tell each other about how bad the federal government is.

Commerce, Wednesday, 9:30 a.m., HHR1.  On the anti-environment agenda: HB2035, a cosmetology "omnibus" bill from House Speaker David Gowan (R-Tin Ear); HB2130, repealing one section of Arizona law barring municipalities and counties from requiring commercial buildings, apartment complexes to report energy usage and conservation, and replacing that with language that looks to be broader (but still bans energy usage/conservation requirements); conditional on the passage of HB2131, barring the regulation of the use of "auxiliary containers" (trash bags, recycling bins, etc.); and HB2132, relating to fees associated with the sale of lead acid batteries.

Judiciary, Wednesday, 10 a.m., HHR3. On the agenda: HB2015, imposing requirements related to publicity pamphlets and early ballots, upon municipalities and counties; HB2224, barring the implementation of any restrictions, including fees, taxes, etc. on private firearms transfers.

Insurance, Wednesday, 10 a.m., HHR4.  On the agenda: HB2002, accelerating the reduction of the rate of the tax on insurance premiums, paid by insurance companies; for the most part, I don't understand the effects of the changes proposed by the bills on this agenda.  Please examine the agenda closely if this is an area of interest to you.

Education, Wednesday, 2 p.m., HHR4.  One bill on the agenda: HB2190, titled "education omnibus". "Omnibus" bills are supposed to contain only non-controversial changes.  However, this one is the brainchild of Rep. Paul Boyer and Sen. Sylvia Allen.  One highlight: if this bill becomes law, local school boards will be able to apply pesticides to their schools without consulting anyone who knows what they are doing or even notifying the people affected by the pesticides.



Appropriations, Wednesday, 2 p.m., HHR1.  Two bills on the agenda: HB2111, requiring state agencies to go to a "zero-based budget"; and HB2468, appropriating $1.8 million to AZAG Mark Brnovich from the internet crimes against children enforcement fund.


Military Affairs and Public Safety, Thursday, 9 a.m., HHR5.  Looks harmless so far.

Government and Higher Education, Thursday, 9 a.m., HHR1.  (Relatively) Long agenda.  Highlight, so to speak: HB2115.

You decide -






Agriculture, Water, and Lands, Thursday, 9 a.m., HHR3. At this point, presentations only.

Elections, Thursday, 2 p.m., HHR4.  Special meeting.  On the agenda: HB2121, restricting what "voter education" efforts the Clean Elections Commission can fund.


On the Senate side of the Capitol -

Natural Resources, Monday, 10 a.m., SHR109.  At this point, only executive nominations and a presentation by an industry lobbyist.

Rules, Monday, 1 p.m., Senate Caucus Room 1.  Rubber stamp time.

Commerce and Workforce Development, Monday, 1:45 p.m., SHR1.  Looks harmless so far.

Water and Energy, Monday, 2 p.m. SHR3.  Looks harmless so far.


Transportation, Tuesday, 2 p.m., SHR1.  On the agenda: SB1228, relating to DUIs, removing the requirement for ignition interlock devices for non-alcohol related DUIs; SB1241, banning the use of photo radar (traffic law enforcement) on state highways, even if the "state highway" serves as a local road.

Appropriations, Tuesday, 2 p.m., SHR109.  One bill on the agenda: SB1143, appropriating $1.8 million to AZAG Mark Brnovich from the internet crimes against children enforcement fund.


Public Safety, Military, and Technology, Wednesday, 9 a.m., SHR1.  On the agenda: SB1017, Sen. John Kavanagh's gambit to preempt Phoenix' move toward issuing ID cards that would serve as sufficient to access municipal services.

Finance, Wednesday, 9 a.m., SHR3.  There are four bills on this agenda, and three of them are related to the state's public pension systems.  I freely concede my utter lack of understanding of them.

Health and Human Services, Wednesday, 2 p.m., SHR1.  Looks harmless so far.

Government, Wednesday, 2 p.m., SHR3.  Looks harmless so far.

Financial Institutions, Wednesday, 2 p.m., SHR109.  Presentation only, at this point in time.


Education, Thursday, 9 a.m., SHR1.  Looks harmless so far.  SB1197 brought a smile to my face, though - it would require that cursive writing be taught in Arizona's schools.

Judiciary, Thursday, 9:30 a.m., SHR109.  On the agenda: SB1047, which would allow county attorneys to do work for other counties; and SB1132, making positions on the executive clemency board full time employment.


Floor Calendars:

There is a Senate COW calendar for Monday.

There will be floor calendars later in the week, but those are generally posted the day before, or even the day of, consideration.


The lege's Capitol Events calendar is here.